Sign In

forgot password?

Blog

Meeting Deadlines

By

A lot goes into building a great mobile app, far more than some people realize. Because of the complexities of backend services, unknown design requirements or even just compromising on what features go in now and which ones can be implemented in a later version, time is always a factor when writing up a proposal for a new client.

Estimating time is never perfect and in some cases you faced with a tight budget of time. So what can you do when running up against a client’s deadline? Here are a few things to consider.

For very large app projects it is always a good idea to clearly define scope and responsibility of both the client team and the development team. This prevents a lot of wasted time waiting for things you don’t think are your responsibility; only to find out the other side thought the same.

Additionally,...

full entry

Self-preservation in the mobile landscape

By

Whether you are a one-man (or woman) shop or a cog in a major company, staying up to speed on the ebb and flow of the mobile world is paramount. Much like web designers and enterprise level developers for complex software, there is plenty to see and do everyday in our space.

It is important to understand the trends in the mobile industry, especially when working within timelines that can extend for months. If you don’t stay up to date on new features and guidelines in the latest operating systems or in the design and usability trends of today’s consumers, your app could look dated and fall behind before you even launch.

The best way to make sure that you aren’t painting yourself in the corner is to look at long established apps for guidance. The more popular the app, the less likely it is to fall into usability traps. Facebook is a...

full entry

Announcing Spine: The Making Of An App

By

Spine, RareWire's first in-house app, was released in Fall 2012 and now has more than 2500 users reading, rating, writing, and publishing micro-stories. Longtime friends and followers know that that the app came from internal suggestions, that it was formed and defined by our creative team, and that it is an experiment in building an app for ourselves. However, you can now follow along through that entire process.

We are pleased to announce Spine: The Making Of An App, a short ten-part documentary by filmmaker Adam Carpentier. Adam was present throughout the beginning stages of Spine and filmed the entire app development process. Full of exclusive interviews and original footage, the film chronicles the origin and development of Spine, the RareWire...

full entry

Just One Scoop More

By

Developing mobile apps, whether you are building them natively, with html5 or using a platform to create a hybrid of the two, is now commonplace. Almost every business, website or organization either already has an app or has plans to do so. Mobile devices account for over 50% of all web traffic these days. It is safe to assume that building an app is more or less expected in this climate.

We have talked here before about making your app stand out from the crowd of millions with great design or unique content via datasources, but these things are becoming the norm in apps more and more everyday (though a great design will always stand out).

There is certainly something to be said for following familiar and standard UI practices for elements like menus or image viewing, but you can still take risks with your app while still maintaining...

full entry

Leaving the app

By

When building an app it is important to think about your options when accessing functions that already exist in dedicated apps on your device. Options for web, email, phone and even things like Facebook and Instagram can potentially lead your user outside of your app where there is no guarantee they will come back.

Luckily, WIRE affords you the ability to curb this quandary a bit. Both iOS and Android allow you to access email draft screens without leaving the app that launches it, so you can safely include email functionality and not lose your user to another app.

In addition both platforms allow for web views to display inside of your app, so unless you have a good reason to send the user out to a mobile browser, there is really no need. Simply apply a next and previous button to a web view complete with a back button inside of your...

full entry